Another lost body

Japanese text follows English.

It was very early on the first day of the week and still dark, when Mary of Magdala came to the tomb. She saw that the stone had been moved away from the tomb and came running to Simon Peter and the other disciple, the one Jesus loved.

John 20:1-2

How many women are looking for lost bodies today? Bodies of husbands, parents, children, loved ones? How many women, in Ukraine, or parts of the Middle East, or Myanmar, are scraping through rubble, not even knowing whether their loved ones are entombed there, not knowing whether they are living or dead? And how many of those women run to get help from men, but find them too busy or preoccupied with fighting to help them? I imagine there is not much time to worry about the dead when you are fighting a war.

In the ancient world, war and violence and slavery were the norm, and peace was the rare exception. This is still true for the majority of humanity today, though it’s easy for us in developed countries to forget that. The emptiness of death has been far closer to most people than it is to us. And so, we find our emptiness elsewhere, in life instead of death. We try to fill the emptiness with glowing screens and mindless games, but in the end, we find that these things are empty too. Deep down none of us is really convinced. We know that we live on the brink of emptiness, and we are afraid.

And yet, about 2000 years ago, in a small and insignificant corner of the Roman Empire, amidst the tumult of a guerrilla uprising, from the tomb of an executed criminal a rose a Lord who proclaimed peace: a Lord who professed God loves the world so much that he would make even the emptiness of death overflow with the fullness of eternal life. And the first person he appeared to was a woman, Mary Magdalene.

There were those who denied that he had risen: those for whom a dead criminal should just have stayed dead, and let them get on with the real men’s work of war and resistance. But those who saw him were so convinced that many of them, including Peter, faced execution rather then denying what they had seen. Confronted with the empty tomb at Easter, we too have a choice: between emptiness and fullness.

The choice comes down to this: whom do we trust?

「朝早く、まだ暗いうちに、マグダラのマリアは墓に行った。そして、墓から石が取りのけてあるのを見た。そこで、シモン・ペトロのところへ、また、イエスが愛しておられたもう一人の弟子のところへ走って行った。」

ヨハネ20:1-2

現在でも、愛している人の死体を探している女性の方がいるでしょう。ウクライナや中東のさまざまの国やミャンマーでも、瓦礫の中を掘って、生きているか死んでいるかもわからずに、夫や子どもたちや両親を探している女の人が確かにいます。その女性たちの中で、男の手伝いを頼みに走る人がいるかもしれませんけれども、その男の人は戦争やお金のことで忙しくて手伝えないことがあるかもしれません。死体のことを心配する為の時間は無いでしょう。

古代の世界では、戦争や争いは普通であって、平和は珍しかったのです。発展しているという国々の国民の私達には忘れやすいことですが、現在の世界の大部分の人は、今でもそうです。そういう人々は、私たちより、死の虚しさに近いと思います。私たちは、代わりに、命の中で虚しさを見つけます。命のむなしさをうめるため、携帯ゲームやネットフリックスなどを使いますが、結局、それらのものも虚しいと悟るようになります。私たちが虚しさの縁に存在していることを分かるようになって、怖がってきます。

しかし、2000年頃前、ローマ帝国の些細で田舎っぽい角で、ゲリラ抵抗の争い中、処刑された犯人のお墓から、主がよみがえられて、平和を宣言しました。その主は、死の虚しさから永遠の命を出すほど、この世を愛している神のことを明らかにしました。誰に初めて現れたかと言えば、マグダラからのマリアという女の人でした。

もちろん、主がよみがえられたことを否定した人々がいました。亡くなった犯人が亡くなったままに残ったら良かったと思って、戦争と抵抗という男の大事な仕事をし続けました。

しかし、よみがえられた主を見た人々の中では、聖ペトロを含めて、彼の復活を否定することより、殺されることを選んだ人々が多かったです。現在の世界でも、キリストの復活を信じることを選んだわけで殺されている人がいます。復活日の後、空の墓を顧みて、私たちも選択しなければなりません。虚しさと充実との選択です。ですので、私たちは誰に信頼したらいいでしょうか?

%d bloggers like this: